PRESS

logo_ew_v02

Since Kanemoto posted the credits on Sept. 24, he’s received Tweets of appreciation from the likes of Lost co-creator Damon Lindelof and sci-fi author/BoingBoing blogger Cory Doctorow… Even if you have no intention of watching THE WALKING DEAD, you can surely appreciate the creativity of Kanemoto’s work, which was made using artwork from the comic by Charlie Aldard and Tony Moore.

Jeff Jensen, Entertainment Weekly

logo_wired_v02

Zombies shamble, bullets fly and brains splatter in this fan-made title sequence for upcoming television series The Walking Dead. Daniel Kanemoto animated the clip using art from the comic upon which the show is based.

“I wondered what the opening titles to this terrifying new television show might look like,” he writes, explaining the clip, “so I animated a spec title sequence using artwork ripped from the pages of the comic, originally illustrated by Charlie Adlard and Tony Moore.”

The slick animation rides perfectly on the song “Fresh Blood” by Eels.

Lewis Wallace, Wired

logo_boingboing_v02

Daniel Kanemoto’s fan-made credits for the upcoming WALKING DEAD TV show (based on the relentless, marvellous long-running comic) is terrifically clever stuff, clearly the output of a trufan of the first water.

Cory Doctorow, Boing Boing

logo_onion_AV_club_v02

The term ‘fan-made’ is generally code for ‘took a bunch of out-of-context clips of people making pouty faces and set them to an Owl City song,’ but that’s definitely not the case with Daniel Kanemoto’s fan-made opening credits for AMC’s THE WALKING DEAD, which is one of the few things currently giving the Internet a good name.

Sean O’Neal, The Onion AV Club

logo_MTV_v01

“The Walking Dead” premieres on AMC next month (October 31), and though we haven’t seen the official opening sequence for the series just yet, a new, fan-made intro to the series is making the rounds — and it’s pretty spectacular.

Created by animation artist Daniel M. Kanemoto out of images from Robert Kirkman, Charlie Adlard and Tony Moore’s celebrated comic book series, the fan-made intro unfolds over The Eels’ haunting (and appropriately mood-setting) tune “Fresh Blood.”

Rick Marshall, MTV

logo_cinemablend_v01

There are some immensely talented people floating out in the ether. These people, be they actors, directors, animators or editors, have simply not yet been found yet by studios, but certainly deserve to be. Thankfully, however, because of the internet, cream has a way of rising to top and the best stuff does get attention. Daniel Kanemoto’s Walking Dead opening titles has fallen into this category.

Using artwork from Robert Kirkman and Tony Moore’s comic book series, Kenemoto has created something absolutely brilliant.

Eric Eisenberg, Cinemablend

logo_birthmoviesdeath_v01

Olly Moss’ Evil Dead poster from Mondo was a great one. And like all great art, it has inspired other artists (as Olly was inspired by Sam Raimi, who had his own inspirations, and so on down the line). That poster sparked something in Daniel M Kanemoto, and this was the result. And it’s a pretty cool result.

Devin Faraci, Birth.Movies.Death.

logo_i09_v01

Have you ever been on a movie-based theme park ride that basically takes you through the entire film? Now imagine if such a ride was hosed down in blood and you were being chased by an undead version of Bruce Campbell. Awesome, right? This amazing Evil Dead tribute cartoon by Daniel Kanemoto takes you through each Dead movie like you’re riding a Necronomicon with seat belts.

Meredith Werner, i09

logo_kuriositas_v01

ARTICLES OF WAR is, I have to admit, one of the best animated short films not produced by a major studio I have ever seen… Guaranteed, you will be drawn in to this from the start – it is engrossing, profound and heartfelt.  You can’t say that of many live action films, let alone animations.

RJ Evans, Kuriositas

logo_bkv_v01

One of the most epic short films ever animated entirely by a single person, and the best 12 minutes you’ll spend online today.

Brian K. Vaughan, Saga, Paper Girls, Y: The Last Man